Portugal successfully decriminalized drugs AND implemented a guaranteed minimum income program?! 12 YEARS AGO?!??

We seldom realize, for example that our most private thoughts and emotions are not actually our own. For we think in terms of languages and images which we did not invent, but which were given to us by our society. — Alan Watts (via cultureofresistance)

(via billhicks)

Fight ClubChuck Palahniuk
The movie was fantastic, and the book was even better. 
Fuck society, basically.
There’s a lot of philosophy and societal critique in the book. A lot of Zen. I like it. And Chuck Palahniuk has got such syntax. He’s short. He’s blunt. He’s sporadic, dark, and extreme in his writing and it is engaging at a minimum.

Fight Club
Chuck Palahniuk

The movie was fantastic, and the book was even better. 

Fuck society, basically.

There’s a lot of philosophy and societal critique in the book. A lot of Zen. I like it. And Chuck Palahniuk has got such syntax. He’s short. He’s blunt. He’s sporadic, dark, and extreme in his writing and it is engaging at a minimum.

OutliersMalcolm Gladwell
I finally got around to reading Outliers, and it was at least as good as the hype says it is. Gladwell draws from anecdotes and statistics to make the claim that people are less responsible for their own success than the unique opportunities they accessed over the course of their lives. Examples include Bill Gates, who had unlimited access to a computer where he could tinker and program in the sixties(!), and The Beatles, who played Hamburg for eight (sometimes more than ten!) hours a day for hundreds of days before going big.
Also, Outliers is where the famed 10,000 hours theory comes from, and it is powerful. Simply put, it’s the idea that it takes 10,000 hours of diligent practice — that is, doing something with the single focus of getting better — to master it. That is what separates the good from the great, and the great from the legends. 
The message that Gladwell reiterates over and over again throughout the book is that we need to acknowledge our roots — our culture, our family, our childhood environment, etc. — to discover what unique opportunities successful people had access to. And then we need to look at our own lives and identify what unique opportunities we have access to, and leverage that shit.

Outliers
Malcolm Gladwell

I finally got around to reading Outliers, and it was at least as good as the hype says it is. Gladwell draws from anecdotes and statistics to make the claim that people are less responsible for their own success than the unique opportunities they accessed over the course of their lives. Examples include Bill Gates, who had unlimited access to a computer where he could tinker and program in the sixties(!), and The Beatles, who played Hamburg for eight (sometimes more than ten!) hours a day for hundreds of days before going big.

Also, Outliers is where the famed 10,000 hours theory comes from, and it is powerful. Simply put, it’s the idea that it takes 10,000 hours of diligent practice — that is, doing something with the single focus of getting better — to master it. That is what separates the good from the great, and the great from the legends. 

The message that Gladwell reiterates over and over again throughout the book is that we need to acknowledge our roots — our culture, our family, our childhood environment, etc. — to discover what unique opportunities successful people had access to. And then we need to look at our own lives and identify what unique opportunities we have access to, and leverage that shit.

Imagine a society that subjects people to conditions that make them terribly unhappy then gives them the drugs to take away their unhappiness. Science fiction, it is already happening to some extent in our own society. Instead of removing the conditions that make people depressed, modern society gives them antidepressant drugs. In effect antidepressants are a means of modifying an individual’s internal state in such a way as to enable him to tolerate social conditions that he would otherwise find intolerable. — Kaczynski (via hellabay)

(via thegrazing)

reaction1:

“The people who run our cities don’t understand graffiti because they   think nothing has the right to exist unless it makes a profit. The   people who truly deface our neighborhoods are the companies that scrawl   giant slogans across buildings and buses trying to make us feel   inadequate unless we buy their stuff. Any advertisement in   public space that gives you no choice whether you see it or not is   yours, it belongs to you, it’s yours to take, rearrange and re-use.   Asking for permission is like asking to keep a rock someone just threw   at your head.” - Banksy

reaction1:

“The people who run our cities don’t understand graffiti because they think nothing has the right to exist unless it makes a profit. The people who truly deface our neighborhoods are the companies that scrawl giant slogans across buildings and buses trying to make us feel inadequate unless we buy their stuff. Any advertisement in public space that gives you no choice whether you see it or not is yours, it belongs to you, it’s yours to take, rearrange and re-use. Asking for permission is like asking to keep a rock someone just threw at your head.” - Banksy

(via randomactsofchaos)